Oracle SQL – A Brief Story of SQL

Introduction to Oracle SQL

In order to access data in Oracle database, a set of specific statements is required by programs and users. This set of statements is called Structured Query Language (SQL). In 1970, a computer scientist Dr. Edgar Frank Codd (Dr. E.F.Codd) published a paper on “A Relational Model of Data for Large Shared Data Banks” in the Association of Computer Machinery (ACM) journal. This model was then widely accepted as the definitive model of RDMS (relational database management system)…

oracle-sql

History of SQL

In 1970, a computer scientist Dr. Edgar Frank Codd (Dr. E.F.Codd) published a paper on “A Relational Model of Data for Large Shared Data Banks” in the Association of Computer Machinery (ACM) journal. This model was then widely accepted as the definitive model of RDMS (relational database management system).

IBM later developed Structured English Query Language (SEQUEL), also well-known today as SQL, to use Codd’s model. They didn’t knew at that time that well known committees such as ANSI (American National Standard Institute) and ISO (International Organization for Standardization) will accept SQL as a standard RDMS language one day. In 1979, Relational Software, Inc. introduced the fist commercially available SQL. You know Relational Software Inc. by another name today, Oracle.

Strength of SQL

SQL is an English type language easily used by application programmers, database administrators, managers and end users. SQL is nothing but an instructions given to Oracle database by you in specific sentences. It is just like your robotic chauffeur who works on your order but only if specific commands are said. However, these commands are easy and does not have any jargon that you should be afraid of.

All data in oracle SQL is stored inside a table. Each table comprises of rows and columns. If you look at the dining table of your house you can imagine it as an oracle table with sticks placed horizontally and vertically in a grid structure forming perfect squares.

The benefits of SQL are…

  • Querying data from the table
  • Insert rows into the table
  • Create objects, replace or drop objects
  • Control access to the database objects
  • Database consistency and accuracy

Interestingly, this standard structure of SQL is not only used in Oracle but also in DB2, MS Access and other databases of the world.

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Hi I am Paras.

Thanks for stopping by at OracleMine.com. Speaking about my brief introduction, I work for a multinational organisation in Oracle related technologies. Being an avid blogger, I would like to inform you about my productivity and motivational blog XpressPlanet.com. Speaking of OracleMine.com, I will try my best to share knowledge on technologies in as simple and understandable manner as possible. You can also contribute your knowledge on OracleMine by writing to us at hioraclemine@gmail.com. Again I appreciate your visit. Hope to see you again and again!

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